Lot #1096
Lot #1099

Lot 1097: Desirable Walker's Company C Company No. 49 Colt U.S. Walker Mod

Desirable Walker's Company C Company No. 49 Colt U.S. Walker Model 1847 Revolver

Auction Date: April 24, 2015

Lot 1097: Desirable Walker's Company C Company No. 49 Colt U.S. Walker Mod

Desirable Walker's Company C Company No. 49 Colt U.S. Walker Model 1847 Revolver

Auction Date: April 24, 2015

Estimated Price: $100,000 - $150,000

Desirable Walker's Company C Company No. 49 Colt U.S. Walker Model 1847 Revolver

Manufacturer: Colt
Model: Walker
Type: Revolver
Gauge: 44 percussion
Barrel: 9 Inch
Finish: brown
Grip: walnut
Stock:
Item Views: 2705
Serial Number:
Catalog Page: 48
Class: Antique
Description:

This is a very rare example of a U.S. Colt Walker Model revolver that was manufactured in 1847 as part of Colt's 1,000 revolver contract with the U.S. Ordnance Department. This pistol is one of the 220 Walker revolvers with "C Company" markings applied at the time the pistols were manufactured. These Walker revolvers were intended for issue to Company C, U.S. Mounted Rifles (USMR) commanded in 1847 by former Texas Ranger Captain Samuel Hamilton Walker. Although the 1,000 Colt Walker Model revolvers purchased by the Ordnance Department were intended for issue to the USMR operating with General Winfield Scott's army in Mexico, 214 of the 220 revolvers marked "C Company" were actually issued to the 1st Regiment Texas Mounted Volunteers by the Vera Cruz Ordnance Depot in October 1847. The Texas Mounted Volunteers were issued a total of 394 Walker Model revolvers. On May 8, 1848, the Texans turned in 191 Walker revolvers at the Vera Cruz Ordnance Depot. Only 82 of these pistols were listed as serviceable. This revolver is boldly marked "C COMPANY No 49" on the left side of the barrel lug above the wedge slot, on the left side of the frame and on the bottom of the grip strap. "C COM-Y No 49" is stamped in tiny letters on the bottom of the trigger guard ahead of the bow. "U.S./1847" is stamped on the right side of the barrel lug above the wedge slot. The top of the barrel flat is roll-stamped: "ADDRESS, SAML COLT NEW-YORK CITY" reading towards the muzzle. Traces of the original oval Ordnance sub-inspection mark are visible on the left side of the grip. There are no visible markings on the cylinder. The wedge and cylinder arbor pin are unmarked. The revolver has the distinctive Walker features which include: (1) part-round/part-octagon barrel with nickel-silver front sight blade, (2) massive, 2 7/16-inch, six-shot, cylinder, (3) loading lever with T-shaped spring, and rounded tip, (4) square-back brass trigger guard with broad bottom and(5) frame with cut-outs for the forward contour of the grips. The rear face of the cylinder has a single safety pin. This revolver is well documented. It is one of ten C Company marked Walker revolvers pictured in the Fall 2003 issue of "THE TEXAS GUN COLLECTOR". This issue also includes a brief article entitled: "THE STORY BEHIND C 49/THE EASTWOOD WALKER". The article contains a story about how one of the early owners, William George Eastwood, used this revolver to defend himself in an Indian attack in which his brother was killed. The revolver remained in the possession of the Eastwood family in California until 1967. In "THE COLT WHITNEYVILLE-WALKER PISTOL" published in 1984, author Robert D. Whittington III lists the serial numbers of 38 known C Company marked Walker revolvers but does not include serial number 49. Whittington identifies a total of 168 surviving military and civilian Walker Colt revolvers from the total production run of approximately 1100 guns. Experts consider the Walker Colt to be the greatest prize in a Colt collection.

Rating Definition:

The revolver is in near relic condition and shows the hard use typical of most surviving Colt Walker revolvers. The 394 C Company and A Company marked Walker revolvers issued to the Texas Mounted Volunteers in October 1847 were the first Walker revolvers issued and saw the hardest service. The loading lever plunger is a period replacement but the other components appear to be original. The revolver has a dark brown, untouched patina with scattered deep pitting on the barrel, frame and cylinder. The muzzle is worn and shows heavy holster wear. The percussion nipples and rear face of the cylinder are flash pitted, and the single safety pin is broken. The brass trigger guard has an attractive patina. None of the original cylinder markings are visible. However, the barrel, frame, trigger guard and back strap markings are legible. The action is loose but functional. The one piece walnut grip is in fair condition with rounded edges, age shrinkage and scattered dents and scratches. This is a rare, historic and documented example of a very desirable C Company marked Colt Walker Model revolver. This revolver almost certainly saw action with the Texas Mounted Volunteers in Mexico in 1847 and is documented as being used in a fight with hostile Indians in Texas or New Mexico in the 1870s. This is a representative example of the most desirable Colt firearm - it would be the centerpiece of any fine Colt collection.



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